BIOSHOCK – THE COLLECTION [Review]: A Classic, Remastered.

BIOSHOCK – THE COLLECTION [Review]: A Classic, Remastered.

"Dynast" Dana Keels IG/Twitter @hatandwand

“Dynast” Dana Keels
IG/Twitter @hatandwand

Would you kindly put down whatever you’re doing and give this review a read? What can one say about BioShock that hasn’t already been said countless times before? The original game, released way back in 2007, completely revolutionized what storytelling could accomplish in a video game, and its shocking revelation still has players reeling to this day.

Bioshock 2, developed by 2k Marin, instead of 2k Boston, was a solid sequel that built on its predecessor and improved the mechanics of the first game. And the vastly different, Bioshock Infinite, was a great game in its own right that brought the series full circle. So how does this “Remastered” Collection fare?

For the most part, pretty good. Bioshock 1 benefits the most from the remaster. The grim and dire dwellings of Rapture are given a brand new coat of paint, easily allowing it to compete with other current gen releases without one having to raise a brow and say “Jesus Christ, this looks old!” Included, is an all-new director’s commentary scattered around rapture via film reels, called “Imagining Bioshock”, that divulges tons of behind-the-scenes decisions that shaped the game. Altogether, the feature is roughly 2-hours of footage that any BioShock fan will love.

As far as the actual game is concerned — other than the new now/next/current-gen paint job, not much else has changed at all. It’s still exactly the same game you fell in love with back in the day–good or bad. Bioshock 1‘s mechanics, by today’s standards, can feel a bit archaic, and there are a few bugs that you might encounter, but none of this is enough to take you out of the experience of Rapture. This game alone is the reason to pick up The Collection.

Shock the System.

Shock the System.

BioShock 2 and Infinite both receive upgrades, but not as substantial as Part One. In BS2, the frame rate is increased and textures are improved; but, again, overall, it’s the same game. (Yeah, reviewing remastered editions of previous games is real exciting — let me tell you…) I was disappointed to find that no commentary or extras were added, despite a game still good enough to hold up on its own. With Infinite, we’ve basically gotten the PC version that was released back in 2013. Yes, PC owners, we get it; consoles are soooo far behind. The game looks better than ever, on consoles, and runs smooth as shit. But like Bioshock 2, we aren’t given any special supplemental features.

All 3 games are worth their salts, or Adam. Bioshock 1 benefits beautifully, while its sequels are great games that are must-plays for fans of the series– or just fans of great storytelling in video games. The Inclusion of all the DLC released for all 3 games is a value you shouldn’t skip. Whether returning to the worlds of Rapture and Columbia, or visiting it for the first time, you’d be hard pressed to find a better gaming value for $60 than the BioShock: Remastered Collection.

4 (out of 5) Bibles.

4 (out of 5) Bibles.

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